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Chivalry 2 Review

Chivalry 2 expands on many of the concepts found in similar games, while at the same time offering a shinier experience than most.

The hack and slash world of medieval war simulators has maintained a strong presence for the past few years, particularly on PC. While Mordhau is the most recent game in the genre to take hold of the conversation, Chivalry 2 has arrived to challenge the throne.

Chivalry 2 Review
Chivalry 2 Review

Developed by Torn Banner Studios and published by Deep Silver, the elevator pitch for Chivalry 2 is as simple as they come. Two factions – the noble Agathans and the more devilish Masons – battle it out on maps with swords, axes, hammers, and whatever other objects they might come across. There are 64 and 40-player modes, each with slightly different objectives but the same core philosophy: kill the people on the other team.

While it may be simplistic, that singular focus is all Chivalry 2 needs to succeed. The siege warfare and fighting pit set dressing enhance the experience, but Chivalry 2’s frantic engagements would still be compelling in a padded room. It doesn’t command players to master each of its concepts if they want to be competitive, it simply tells them to charge at one another and cause a bit of chaos, screaming battle cries as they meet their grisly doom.

Of course, that’s not to say that Chivalry 2‘s combat is overly simple – far from it, in fact. Chivalry 2 has a steep learning curve that allows those that master it to become unstoppable forces on the battlefield, while less-skilled players become people-shaped targets for them to hack away at. That same skill gap can be found in any multiplayer game, though, and Chivalry 2 does provide players with everything they need to be on equal footing. It just comes down to whether or not players can refine those concepts.

What separates Chivalry 2 from other multiplayer games is how it handles dying. While it’s still frustrating to have one’s head chopped off, Chivalry 2 adds in a few extra elements to spice things up whenever the player is outmatched. For instance, sometimes a player’s arm will get cut off, giving them a short amount of time to swing whatever one-handed weapon they might be carrying at their attacker, their screen telling them it’s “just a flesh wound” the entire time.

The game also makes a point to simply knock players down on occasion rather than just killing them. While this is normally a death sentence, players can either be revived from this downed state or spend their last few moments throwing punches at other players’ groins. It’s these moments of absurdity wrapped up in intense battles that make Chivalry 2 such a refreshing experience, especially when played alongside friends.

What do you think?

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